Will young invincibles buy (into) mandated health coverage? The Clash of tweets, the brain and English Rumspringa

Here is a quick discussion of how insurance should work under Obamacare-

· The young peoples’ premiums which should theoretically have the lower probability of catastrophic illness should offset the increased utilization of healthcare by the graying Baby Boomers.

· More money from 20 year old, less office visits should offsets visits of Grandmother who will have higher premiums but also more health care utilization.

· Voila! A healthful societal success!

Take this paradox for a spin—

Got some job history, young one? Believe me, it is not enough quite yet to offset the need to get covered now during the start of your economic productivity. For those young people from the most disenfranchised families with a history of lack of insurance and unstable work histories, the decisions revolved around accepting the Medicaid expansion along party lines leaves many kids in a lurch.

Medicaid expansion is concentric to Obamacare. Take the arduous tabulation of “reported” enrollments in the state-based health exchanges shouldered by the Advisory Board Company (ABC). Two weeks after the roll out, the Advisory Board Company (2013) reported that 130,000 people have applied for coverage through the health exchanges across 15 states that offered up the goods (the data).

The proof some say is in the pudding but this pudding is more of a murky gruel. Having applied for coverage does not mean covered right now. Many applications in some states default to being Medicaid eligible, not exchanges in the traditional sense. Some states continue to poo-poo on Medicaid expansion, though my home state of Ohio got on board. As ABC pointed out, nobody has paid a premium let alone a penalty yet. The applicants have only expressed intent to become covered. What happens when a young person decides not paying that exchange premium and take the penalty ruler to the knuckles versus not defaulting on that student loan that cannot remain in deferment?

The invincibles are once again invisible to Obamacare’s safety net. How are we set to navigate them back once the media spin of ACA’s hiccups and the economic downturn takes hold in getting covered? I say that we must account for perceptions of DC Comics-flavored invincibility, modernization of youth culture, social marketing with a dash of brain function for good measure.

Invincibility may couple with increased risk taking within this young cohort. Rice (1996) defined youth culture as “the sum of the ways of living of adolescents; it refers to the body of norms, values, and practices recognized and shared by members of the adolescent society as appropriate guides to action”. It must be said that youth culture is a relatively new phenomenon. Do we forget that children were given adult responsibilities such as child labor that gave them no ability to “find themselves”? Inadequate neurotransmitter levels may lead to impulsivity. That darn frontal lobe has not been kissed with the ability to have a reliable gut instinct (defined as following the adult world rules). Lastly, youth are less able to make connections between experience and memory.

Now if that memory does not trigger an “a-ha, maybe that hit of salvia is not a good idea this time”, what are we left with?

We must account for this youth reality as it is now. The child worker of yesteryear was forced to take an economically derived “adult “identity covered in soot all the while his brain remained woefully underdeveloped. Youth today have been protected from unfair child labor and celebrated autonomy (within reason) so the youth can relish in a period of an English Rumspringa that bleeds into their 30’s. They have a more fair life course. With that newly allowed time of this new life, young people have time to build social networks of friends. This is not a big surprise to parents who have tried to evoke “if your friends jumped off a bridge”. If the social network of friends using their influence to make a belief or action contagious, young people have an affinity to being a part of the in-group. Let’s all bungee over the Colorado together.

One, two, three, hell yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

It is that social influence within networks that works to get people to adopt health behaviors. That is if we frame the intervention to account for these conforming networks (Smith & Christakis, 2008). Yes, they can make up their own minds to take the coverage or the penalty. Will that take that insured baptism in the end? Young people (18-35) still have high rates of risk factors that would really require health care intervention (such as smoking, drinking, serious mental health impairments). It is amazing how the body accumulates the follies and unfortunates of youth in its cells. Unless something is catastrophic (which is in itself not a guarantee that care will be sought), the body does not tell its unfortunate tale for many years to come.

The roll out has done little to entice with its social media machine to make and counter this invincibility point. While the jury is still out, there is a possible untapped potential of using larger- scale social media campaigns to support behavior change (Centola, 2013).The Obama administration fills my inbox until my box “runneth over”. Now is the time to leverage social media to engage health behaviors such as signing up for Obamacare with an empirically sound research design. Maybe these social marketing messages could outshine the latest meme of cats with witty words just long enough to support that conscious jump over to the health exchange website. And the Advisory Board Company will keep the ticker of those jumps.

References:

Centola, D. (2013) Social Media and the Science of Health Behavior. Circulation. 127: 2135-2144.

Diamond, D. (October 16, 2013). More than 130,000 people have applied for coverage through ACA exchanges. Retrieved on October 16, 2013 from The Advisory Board Company Daily Briefing Blog at http://www.advisory.com/Daily-Briefing/Blog/2013/10/More-than-130000-people-have-applied-for-Obamacare.

Rice, F. (1996). The adolescent: Development, relationships and culture (7th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Smith, K. & Christakis, N. (2008). Social Networks and Health. Annual Review of Sociology. 34: 409-29.

Advertisements

About Michele Battle-Fisher

This is an archive of the Orgcomplexity Blog. Please follow me at the following sites: mbattlefisher.wix.com/orgcomplexity Michele Battle-Fisher (Facebook author page) www.linkedin.com/in/mbattlefisher mbattlefisher (Twitter) michele.battle.fisher (Skype) Author Website http://amazon.com/author/michelebattlefisher

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s