Arts Humanities and Complex Networks final call for papers March 28, 2014

Invitations for submissions for

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks
— 5th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2014

taking place in Berkeley at the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California,
on Tuesday, June 3, 2014.

Deadline for submission: March 28, 2014.

TO SEE PAPERS PRESENTED AT LAST FOUR CONFERENCES SEE

http://ahcncompanion.info/ 

 

 

NEW DEVELOPMENT for Orgcomplexity- I have a book coming out this year!

I have actually been approached as to why I have not posted on Orgcomplexity as much in recent months.

There is actually a very good reason.

I am ready to announce that my single-authored book that brings systems thinking to health policy and ethics is under contract with Springer. It will be a part of the inaugural SpringerBriefs series in Public Health Ethics. I will keep everyone updated with the publication details in the next few months. The target for publication is mid-2014.

Thank you for supporting Orgcomplexity and I hope that you will continue to follow my book progress over the coming months.

All the best,

Michele Battle-Fisher

Bertalanffy Center- European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research 2014, 22-25 April- Vienna

 

The Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science proudly presents the upcoming European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research 2014, 22-25 April 2014 in Vienna. It is the second time they are responsible for the co-production of the most distinguished systems organizations and communities in the world, in addition connecting member organizations of the International Federation for Systems Research. The EMCSR create a hub for showcasing the advancement of systems approaches that contribute solutions to the complex challenges of today, the focus is on “Civilisation at the Crossroads: Response and Responsibility of the Systems Sciences.” 

The call for papers and participation is still open until 28th of February. If you want to join and contribute to the vibrant community we were able to connect already, do not miss this opportunity to submit your extended abstract and get published in the EMCSR book of abstracts 2014.

 

2014 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, and Prediction- Washington DC April 1-4, 2014

Registration is now open for SBP14, the 2014 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, and Prediction.

SBP14 will be held at the UCDC Center, downtown Washington DC, USA April 1 – 4, 2014.

Link to the main conference pages, http://sbp-conference.org/

*** Please note that early registration deadline is March 8, 2014. ***

Link directly to registration page, http://sbp-conference.org/registration/

SOME EXCITING ITEMS ON THE PROGRAM!

SBP 2014 CHALLENGE – see: http://sbp-conference.org/challenge/

The SBP Challenge aims to demonstrate the real-world and interdisciplinary impact of social computing. The challenge will engage the social computing research community in solving a relevant, interesting, and challenging research problem that will advance the theory, methodology, and/or application of social computing.

TUTORIALS – see: http://sbp-conference.org/tutorial/

Morning and afternoon tutorials are offered on Tuesday, April 1 (included with registration fee):

Morning Session

(1) Modeling a Mobile World

Presenters:

Wendy J. Nilsen, PhD, Health Scientist Administrator, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research/NIH

Stephen Intille, PhD, Associate Professor, College of Computer and Information Science & Dept. of Health Sciences, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University

Donna Spruijt-Metz, MFA, Ph.D, Director, Mobile and Connected Health Program, Center for Economic and Social Research, Associate Professor, Departments of Preventive Medicine and Psychology, University of Southern California

Misha Pavel, PhD, College of Computer and Information Science, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University

(2) Introduction to social data analysis combining R and Python

Presenter: Dr. Jose Manuel MAGALLANES, Center for Social Complexity, George Mason University, and Departamento de Ciencias Sociales, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú

Afternoon Session

(1) Multiscale Strategic Interaction with vmStrat Models

Presenter: Dr. David Sallach, Associate Director, Center for Complex Adaptive Agent Systems Simulation (CAS), Argonne National Laboratory;  Senior Fellow, Computation Institute, The University of Chicago

(2) Charting Collections of Connections in Social Media: Creating Maps and Measures with NodeXL

Presenter:

Dr. Marc A. Smith, Chief Social Scientist, Connected Action Consulting Group

For a full description of tutorials, see: http://sbp-conference.org/tutorial/

UKHLS and social connections data

homophily

Michele Battle-Fisher:

UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS) includes the first module on social networks- repost of blog from Dave Griffiths of Stirling (UK)

Originally posted on Pulling Apart:

The latest wave of Understanding Society , or the UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS), includes the first module on social networks. The UKHLS was first run in 2009, emerging from the previous 1991-2008 British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) , providing detailed information on all individuals in 30,000 UK homes. Those individuals in Wave A, or who entered from the BHPS, are tracked every year and interviewed along with all others within their household. Therefore, when households are stable across time (i.e., a married childless couple who always live together)  the same individuals are interviewed each year. But, when  households change (i.e., a married couple whose grown-up children move out of the parental home and have flatmates, partners and children of their own) different people become eligible for inclusion.

Individuals are interviewed annually, covering a wide range of subjects including, amongst others, employment, politics, health, income and education. In addition, there…

View original 720 more words

Time to get a piece of the modeling pi

But there is another pi that some may be less aware of – the theoretical formalism of pi calculus in process algebra. Thank Robin Milner, the brain behind the theory of pi calculus, that approaches systems as fundamentally able to reorganize themselves through interaction (see Milner, 1999). Jeannette Wing (2002) explained the utility of pi calculus in a way that I found highly approachable (or as cuddly that process calculus can be). The process is that mysterious force based on inputs that control a system (see Wing, 2002). The channels tie together through some mode of communication (or relationship) (see Wing, 2002).

 Systems are made of components that are interdependent. Also the process can involve any number of balancing and reinforcing factors that loop together. Displaying a recognized connection to another agent is, at its center, systemic. For example, when using pi calculus theory within computer code modeling, what is of interest is the process calculus of the messaging (connections) that may be measured asynchronously (with a time delay) or synchronously (at the same time). The computer code using pi calculus is an approximation, replicating the nature of the concurrent inputs/outputs into the system. Students in software engineering class accept, perhaps with unabashed relief, that approximation of “truth” of such calculus and move on to get their modeling done. Maybe policy needs another definition of truth.

What can policy learn from this theory of pi?

 

1.      There should be an accounting of the systemic process underlying the policy. This may include looking at the interdependence and feedbacks among elements of the system, ongoing assessments of the past policy successes and failures, as well as changing landscape of epidemiological evidence.

2.      Dynamic changes in inputs/outcomes are debated beyond the mental models offered around the table (e.g. use of formal modeling).

3.      Overlap (concurrence) of different systems at play in the policy should be explored.

 

References

Milner, R. (1999). Communication and Mobile Systems: The Pi Calculus. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wing, J. (2002). FAQ on pi-calculus. Retrieved on February 18, 2014 from http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~wing/publications/Wing02a.pdf.

 

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 5th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2014


Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks

— 5th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2014

taking place in Berkeley at the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California,
on Tuesday, June 3, 2014.

Submission:
For submission instructions please go to:
http://artshumanities.netsci2014.net/

Deadline for submission: March 28, 2014.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by April 7, 2014.

Abstract:
For the fifth time, it is our pleasure to bring together pioneer work in the overlap of arts, humanities, network research, data science, and information design. The 2014 symposium will follow our established recipe, leveraging interaction between those areas by means of keynotes, a number of contributions, and a high-profile panel discussion. In our call, we are looking for a diversity of research contributions revolving around networks in culture, networks in art, networks in the humanities, art about networks, and research in network visualization. Focusing on these five pillars that have crystallized out of our previous meetings, the 2014 symposium again strives to make further impact in the arts, humanities, and natural sciences. Running parallel to the NetSci2014 conference, the symposium provides a unique opportunity to mingle with leading researchers in complex network science, potentially sparking fruitful collaborations. As in previous years, selected papers will be published in print, both in a Special Section of Leonardo Journal and in a dedicated Leonardo eBook MIT-Press: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007S0UA9Q

Confirmed Keynote:
Lada Adamic, Associate Professor, University of Michigan & Data Scientist, Facebook, USA

As in previous years, we will feature three high-profile keynote speakers from the areas of cultural data science, network visualization, and network art.

Best regards,
The AHCN2014 organizers,
Maximilian Schich*, Roger Malina**, Isabel Meirelles***, and Meredith Tromble****
artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com

*    Associate Professor, ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA
**   Executive Editor at Leonardo Publications, France/USA
***  Associate Professor, Dept. of Art + Design, Northeastern University, USA
**** School of Interdisciplinary Studies, San Francisco Art Institute, USA

Complex Systems, Health Disparities & Population Health: Building Bridges February 24-25, 2014 National Institutes of Health

[The University of Michigan Network on Inequality, Complexity, & Health presents Complex Systems, Health Disparities & Population Health: Building Bridges. February 24-25, 2014. Natcher Conference Center. NIH Campus, Bethesda, Maryland.]

The University of Michigan Network on Inequality, Complexity, & Health presents

Complex Systems, Health Disparities &
Population Health: Building Bridges
February 24-25, 2014
Natcher Conference Center
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CAMPUS
Bethesda, Maryland
Deadline to register: February 14, 2014
Deadline to submit a poster (through the registration form): January 15, 2014
Register at: https://www.regonline.com/complexitydisparitiespophealth
Visit Conference Website at: http://conferences.thehillgroup.com/UMich/complexity-disparities-populationhealth/
Improving population health and eliminating health disparities is a critical task, yet our efforts are stymied by the complexity of the task, involving as it does causes of poor health that range from public policy to the nature of our neighborhoods to how we behave to biology.
On February 24-25, 2014, at the National Institutes of Health Natcher Conference Center in Bethesda, Maryland, join scholars and practitioners from the United States and abroad to learn about and see examples of how complex systems science can help guide our research and policy efforts to eliminate health disparities and improve the health of our population.
You’ll learn about the methods and tools of complex systems and how they can be used to address critical determinants of health and health disparities over the life course, including those that involve the health care system, socioeconomic status and mobility, institutions, neighborhoods, behavior, cognitive processes, and neurosciences.
This ground-breaking conference, organized by the University of Michigan Network on Inequality, Complexity & Health with sponsorship from the National Institutes of Health Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, will be of interest to those from public and health sciences, social sciences, computer and engineering sciences, complex systems, health and social policy, government agencies, and funding agencies who are interested in eliminating health disparities and improving population health.

 

The 1st European Conference on Social Networks (EUSN)- July 2014

The 1st European Conference on Social Networks (EUSN, eusn@eusn.org) will be held at the Faculty of Arts, Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) on July 1-4, 2014.

The 1st European Conference on Social Networks (EUSN, eusn@eusn.org) will be held at the Faculty of Arts, Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) on July 1-4, 2014. This European conference replaces the annual ASNA and UKSNA conference in 2014, having received a regional conference endorsement by INSNA.

In this occasion the EUSN will pay special attention to Latin American researchers on social networks in order to foster the creation of a regional conference also in Latin America.

The EUSN is organized by the research group egolab-GRAFO (Social and Cultural Anthropology Department), with the support of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts, the Algorithmics Group from the University of Konstanz, the Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas (CIS), the Department of Educational and Cultural Sociology from the University of Cologne, and the Laboratory of Personal Networks and Communities (LRPC), University of Sevilla. Other Departments and Institutes from the UAB that support the Conference are the Centre for Sociological Studies of Daily Life and Work (QUIT-IEE) of the Department of Sociology, and the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), among others.

Poster deadline approaching Jan 15- Conference on Complex Systems, Health Disparities & Population Health

 

 

Conference on Complex Systems, Health Disparities & Population Health: Building Bridges
 
Poster Abstract Deadline is Approaching!
 
February 24-25, 2014 | Natcher Conference Center, NIH Campus, Bethesda, MD
Presented by the University of Michigan Network on Inequality, Complexity and Health
 
Deadline to submit a poster (through the registration form): January 15, 2014
Deadline to register:February 14, 2014
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